From Out to In

We like insiders. We want to be insiders. No one wants to be on the outside trying to see whats happening. We value that inside position and that insider information. So we try to position ourselves on the inside. We feel more like we are in the inside if we keep more and more people on the outside. The people outside are dangerous after all. They might change something. They might take my place. They might have an idea better than mine. They might make me an outsider.

God called all types of people to himself and to his work, but there is an emphasis on God using the outsider. Abel, the younger brother, is accepted rather than Cain, the older brother (Gen. 4). God chose to work through Isaac rather than Ishmael (Gen. 17). God chose to work through Jacob, the younger brother, rather than Esau the older brother (Gen. 25-27). God chose to work through Joseph, the youngest brother, rather than the older brothers (Gen. 37). The oldest male was supposed to be the heir, but God chose to demonstrate his power and manifest his glory through the younger brother–the outsider.

As the New Testament age began, Jesus is surrounded by outsiders (the tax collectors, publicans, sinful people, Samaritans, lepers, and the demon possessed). Those outsiders became Jesus’ insiders. Those outsiders were made to be the “kingdom which would never be destroyed” (Dan. 2:44).

Are you an outsider? Does the world view you as weak or unimportant? Rejoice! God has always used people just like you. “For consider your calling, brothers: not many of you were wise according to worldly standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth. But God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong; God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are, so that no human being might boast in the presence of God. And because of him you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom from God, righteousness and sanctification and redemption, so that, as it is written, Let the one who boasts, boast in the Lord” (1 Cor. 1:25).

I am thankful for weakness. It allows me to see God’s strength more clearly. Why should I depend on myself when I can depend on God? Why should I trust myself when I can trust God?

One thought on “From Out to In

  1. So I assume ya’ll made it to the house OK?

    [image: Mailtrack] Sender notified by Mailtrack 09/05/19, 01:22:55 PM

    On Thu, Sep 5, 2019 at 9:16 AM Restoration Theology wrote:

    > D. L. DeBord posted: ” We like insiders. We want to be insiders. No one > wants to be on the outside trying to see whats happening. We value that > inside position and that insider information. So we try to position > ourselves on the inside. We feel more like we are in the inside i” >

    Like

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