Every First Day of the Week?

The “first day of the week” is Sunday. In the ancient world, it would have been another workday. But for Christians, the first day of the week is a special day on which we gather to participate in the Lord’s Supper. Why is it we gather on every first day of the week? Here are some brief notes on why we want to gather on every first day of the week for God’s glory as we enjoy the Lord’s Supper.

SANCTIFIED BY THE RESURRECTION

However, the Lord’s resurrection sanctified that day. In the 2nd century Justin Martyr wrote, “Sunday is the day on which we all hold our common assembly…Jesu Christ on the same day rose from the dead” (Apology I.67).

SAINTS ROUTINELY GATHERED

The disciples met routinely on the Lord’s Day (Jn. 20:26). The church was opened on a Sunday in Acts 2. Every first day of the week was a convenient and appropriate time for the contribution on every first day of the week (1 Cor. 16:2).

Mosheim recorded, “All Christians were unanimous in setting apart the first day of the week, on which the triumphant Saviour arose from the dead, for the solemn celebration of public worship” (I.35).

SCRIPTURE LINKS THE MEAL AND THE DAY

The first day of the week, Sunday, was associated with the resurrection and also with the Lord’s Supper. Revelation 1:10 describes Sunday as the Lord’s Day. A special Greek word is used there (κυριακῇ) which is also used in 1 Corinthians 11:20 (κυριακὸν). This word has to do with something that belongs especially to the Lord. The Lord’s day and the Lord’s Supper are the only things described with this word. So, perhaps, there is a link we are to see between the Lord’s Supper and the Lord’s Day.

STAYING TO HAVE THE SUPPER

Acts 20 records that Paul stayed with the saints so that they could have the Supper on the first day of the week. If the Supper could be observed on any day of the week, it seems there would be no need to wait until the first day of the week and then to focus on the first day of the week.

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